Eating disorders

  • Transgender-identified youth are disproportionately likely to suffer from eating disorders. Expand
    Transgender-identified youth are disproportionately likely to suffer from eating disorders.

    In a review [1] of 20 publications, significantly higher rates of eating disorder symptoms were documented in transgender youth (aged between 8 and 25).

    Another study [2] corroborated this connection, noting that data, while scarce, suggest “an overrepresentation of eating pathology among adolescents with GD [gender dysphoria] or transgender identity.”

    REFERENCES

    [1] Coelho, J., Suen, J., Clark, B., Marshall, S., Geller, J. & Lam, P.-Y. (2019). Eating Disorder Diagnoses and Symptom Presentation in Transgender Youth: a Scoping Review. Current Psychiatry Reports 21. [Link]

    [2] Kaltiala-Heino, R., Bergman, H., Työläjärvi, M., & Frisén, L. (2018). Gender dysphoria in adolescence: current perspectives. Adolescent health, medicine and therapeutics 9, 31–41. [Link]

  • There seems to be a connection between disordered eating patterns and gender-related distress. Expand
    There seems to be a connection between disordered eating patterns and gender-related distress.

    In a review [1] of 20 publications, a consistent theme emerged: transgender youth (aged 8 to 25) engaged in food restriction and/or compensatory eating behaviors to prevent puberty onset or progression.

    The review suggested that, for some transgender youth, these behaviors may be understood as a means of coping with gender-related distress. However, the exact nature of this observed connection is uncertain.

    REFERENCES

    [1] Coelho, J., Suen, J., Clark, B., Marshall, S., Geller, J. & Lam, P.-Y. (2019). Eating Disorder Diagnoses and Symptom Presentation in Transgender Youth: a Scoping Review. Current Psychiatry Reports 21. [Link]