Detransition

  • There is very little evidence on the number of people who have detransitioned. Expand
    There is very little evidence on the number of people who have detransitioned.

    In a study [1] of 100 detransitioners, only 24% of respondents informed their clinicians that they had detransitioned. The vast majority made no attempt to contact their clinics.

    Not only does this mean that we have no way of ascertaining how many people detransition, it also potentially impact clinics’ assessments of patient satisfaction.

    One paper [2] claimed that the detransition rate was 13.1%. However, this research relies on data from the U.S. Transgender Survey, which was conducted via community outreach organizations, and may therefore have excluded detransitioners who were no longer in touch with any such organizations. Only people who still identified as members of the trans community were included:

    The 2015 U.S. Transgender Survey (USTS) was conducted by the National Center for Transgender Equality (NCTE) to examine the experiences of transgender adults in the United States.

    By contrast, the study by Lisa Littman [1] sought respondents from a political and ideological variety of sources.

    In a recent retrospective case-note review [3], performed as a service evaluation over twelve months, 6.9% of participants met the case definition of detransitioning, yet 21.7% disengaged from the study.

    In general, detransitioners remain an underserved population in healthcare, with far more research required to understand their needs [4].

    REFERENCES

    [1] Littman, L. (2021). Individuals Treated for Gender Dysphoria with Medical and/or Surgical Transition Who Subsequently Detransitioned: A Survey of 100 Detransitioners. Arch Sex Behav. [Link]

    [2] Turban, J.L., Loo, S.S., Almazan, A.N., & Keuroghlian, A.S. (2021). Factors Leading to “Detransition” Among Transgender and Gender Diverse People in the United States: A Mixed-Methods Analysis. LGBT health 8(4): 273-280. [Link]

    [3] Hall, R., Mitchell, L., & Sachdeva, J. (2021). Access to care and frequency of detransition among a cohort discharged by a UK national adult gender identity clinic: Retrospective case-note review. BJPsych Open 7(6): E184. [Link]

    [4] Expósito-Campos, P. (2021). A Typology of Gender Detransition and Its Implications for Healthcare Providers. Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy 47 (3): 270-280. [Link]

  • In one study of detransitioners, around half originally believed that transition would mean they were better treated. Expand
    In one study of detransitioners, around half originally believed that transition would mean they were better treated.

    In a study [1] of 100 detransitioners, 50.7% of females and 45.2% of males identified with the comment “I felt I would be treated better if I was perceived as the target gender”.

    REFERENCES

    [1] Littman, L. (2021). Individuals Treated for Gender Dysphoria with Medical and/or Surgical Transition Who Subsequently Detransitioned: A Survey of 100 Detransitioners. Arch Sex Behav. [Link]

  • In one study of detransitioners, around half were worried about the medical complications of transitioning. Expand
    In one study of detransitioners, around half were worried about the medical complications of transitioning.

    A study [1] of 100 detransitioners showed that 49% had concerns about potential medical complications from transitioning. 

    A second study [2] of detransitioners and desisters – most of whom were detransitioners who had undergone medical transition – arrived at a higher figure, with 62% citing health concerns as a motivating factor for detransition.

    REFERENCES

    [1] Littman, L. (2021). Individuals Treated for Gender Dysphoria with Medical and/or Surgical Transition Who Subsequently Detransitioned: A Survey of 100 Detransitioners. Arch Sex Behav. [Link]

    [2] Vandenbussche, E. (2021). Detransition-Related Needs and Support: A Cross-Sectional Online Survey. Journal of Homosexuality. [Link]

  • In one study of detransitioners, around half believed that they received inadequate care. Expand
    In one study of detransitioners, around half believed that they received inadequate care.

    The majority (55.0%) of detransitioners in a 100-participant study [1] felt that they did not receive an adequate evaluation from a doctor or mental health professional before starting transition.

    A second study [2] of detransitioners and desisters – most of whom were detransitioners who had undergone medical transition – arrived at a similar, although slightly lower, figure, with 45% of detransitioners not feeling properly informed about the health implications of the accessed treatments and interventions before undergoing them.

    REFERENCES

    [1] Littman, L. (2021). Individuals Treated for Gender Dysphoria with Medical and/or Surgical Transition Who Subsequently Detransitioned: A Survey of 100 Detransitioners. Arch Sex Behav. [Link]

    [2] Vandenbussche, E. (2021). Detransition-Related Needs and Support: A Cross-Sectional Online Survey. Journal of Homosexuality. [Link]

  • One study of detransitioners found that a large proportion of them believed, in hindsight, that they were suffering from internalized homophobia. Expand
    One study of detransitioners found that a large proportion of them believed, in hindsight, that they were suffering from internalized homophobia.

    A study of 100 detransitioners [1] found that homophobia or difficulty accepting themselves as lesbian, gay, or bisexual was expressed by 23.0% as a reason for transition and subsequent detransition.

    In another study of detransitioners and desisters [2] – most of whom were detransitioners who had undergone medical transition – 52% expressed a psychological need for learning to cope with internalized homophobia.

    REFERENCES

    [1] Littman, L. (2021). Individuals Treated for Gender Dysphoria with Medical and/or Surgical Transition Who Subsequently Detransitioned: A Survey of 100 Detransitioners. Arch Sex Behav. [Link]

    [2] Vandenbussche, E. (2021). Detransition-Related Needs and Support: A Cross-Sectional Online Survey. Journal of Homosexuality. [Link]

  • In one study, female detransitioners were three times more likely to be lesbians than to be straight. Expand
    In one study, female detransitioners were three times more likely to be lesbians than to be straight.

    A study [1] of 100 detransitioners, the majority of whom were female, showed that 26.1% of the females were homosexual before they transitioned.

    Only 8.7% considered themselves heterosexual.

    REFERENCES

    [1] Littman, L. (2021). Individuals Treated for Gender Dysphoria with Medical and/or Surgical Transition Who Subsequently Detransitioned: A Survey of 100 Detransitioners. Arch Sex Behav. [Link]

  • In one study of detransitioners, males were three times more likely than females to have transitioned for erotic reasons. Expand
    In one study of detransitioners, males were three times more likely than females to have transitioned for erotic reasons.

    In a study [1] of 100 detransitioners, 38.7% of males identified with the comment “I had erotic reasons for wanting to transition”.

    The figure for females was a third of this, at 13%.

    REFERENCES

    [1] Littman, L. (2021). Individuals Treated for Gender Dysphoria with Medical and/or Surgical Transition Who Subsequently Detransitioned: A Survey of 100 Detransitioners. Arch Sex Behav. [Link]